JavaScript’s Apply, Call, and Bind Methods are Essential for JavaScript Professionals

»july. 10 2013 103

Prerequisite:
Understand JavaScript’s “this” With Ease, and Master It.
JavaScript Objects
Understand JavaScript Closures
(This is an intermediate to advanced topic)

Duration: About 40 minutes.

Bov Academy

of Programming and Innovation

Become an Elite/Highly Paid Specialized Software Engineer (Frontend, Fullstack, etc.)

Within 8–10 Months, Earn MORE than the Avg. New CS Graduate Earns.

45%-Off Tuition for the December Session

By the founder of JavaScriptIsSexy

Functions are objects in JavaScript, as you should know by now, if you have read any of the prerequisite articles. And as objects, functions have methods, including the powerful Apply, Call, and Bind methods. On the one hand, Apply and Call are nearly identical and are frequently used in JavaScript for borrowing methods and for setting the this value explicitly. We also use Apply for variable-arity functions; you will learn more about this in a bit.

  • Receive Updates

On the other hand, we use Bind for setting the this value in methods and for currying functions.

We will discuss every scenario in which we use these three methods in JavaScript. While Apply and Call come with ECMAScript 3 (available on IE 6, 7, 8, and modern browsers), ECMAScript 5 (available on only modern browsers) added the Bind method. These 3 Function methods are workhorses and sometimes you absolutely need one of them. Let’s begin with the Bind method.
Continue Reading

16 JavaScript Concepts JavaScript Professionals Must Know Well

»july. 9 2013 61

(Essential JavaScript Concepts for Modern JavaScript Development )

If you plan to work as JavaScript Professional, you must know some JavaScript concepts and JavaScript-related web-development technologies, particularly as a modern JavaScript developer. If you know the 16 concepts enumerated below, you have the skill necessary to build world-class modern JavaScript web applications, and you are set for the near future—0 to 3 years.

Bov Academy

of Programming and Innovation

Become an Elite/Highly Paid Specialized Software Engineer (Frontend, Fullstack, etc.)

Within 8–10 Months, Earn MORE than the Avg. New CS Graduate Earns.

45%-Off Tuition for the December Session

By the founder of JavaScriptIsSexy

I will expound on each of these sixteen concepts, and I am hopeful all of us will have become better JavaScript programmers by the time we get through all of them. I have completed most of the 16 concepts with just a few more to go, so keep reading and learning. And sign up for the newsletter to get the latest updates.

  • Receive Updates

I trust you have learned JavaScript properly or you already know JavaScript enough to build a simple JavaScript-only web application. While the 16 concepts note below are neither complex nor difficult, you will understand them best if you already know at least some basic JavaScript.

The sixteen concepts that every modern JavaScript developer should know well follow:

  1. JavaScript Objects in Detail
  2. JavaScript Prototype in Plain, Detailed Language
  3. JavaScript Variable Scope and Hoisting Explained
  4. Understand JavaScript Closures With Ease
  5. Understand JavaScript Callback (Higher-Order) Functions
  6. Understand JavaScript’s “this” With Clarity, and Master It
  7. JavaScript’s Apply, Call, and Bind Methods are Essential
  8. Learn HTML5, CSS3, and Responsive WebSite Design
  9. Object Oriented JavaScript (OOP in JavaScript)
  10. Learn Node.js Completely and With Confidence Or Learn Meteor.js Properly
  11. Continue Reading

OOP In JavaScript: What You NEED to Know

»march. 19 2013 216

(Object Oriented JavaScript: Only Two Techniques Matter)

Bov Academy

of Programming and Innovation

Become an Elite/Highly Paid Specialized Software Engineer (Frontend, Fullstack, etc.)

Within 8–10 Months, Earn MORE than the Avg. New CS Graduate Earns.

45%-Off Tuition for the December Session

By the founder of JavaScriptIsSexy

Prerequisite:
JavaScript Objects in Detail
JavaScript Prototype

Object Oriented Programming (OOP) refers to using self-contained pieces of code to develop applications. We call these self-contained pieces of code objects, better known as Classes in most OOP programming languages and Functions in JavaScript. We use objects as building blocks for our applications. Building applications with objects allows us to adopt some valuable techniques, namely, Inheritance (objects can inherit features from other objects), Polymorphism (objects can share the same interface—how they are accessed and used—while their underlying implementation of the interface may differ), and Encapsulation (each object is responsible for specific tasks).

In this article, we are concerned with only Inheritance and Encapsulation since only these two concepts apply to OOP in JavaScript, particularly because, in JavaScript, objects can encapsulate functionalities and inherit methods and properties from other objects. Accordingly, in the rest of the article, I discuss everything you need to know about using objects in JavaScript in an object oriented manner—with inheritance and encapsulation—to easily reuse code and abstract functionalities into specialized objects.

  • Receive Updates

We will focus on only the best two techniques1 for implementing OOP in JavaScript. Indeed, many techniques exist for implementing OOP in JavaScript, but rather than evaluate each, I choose to focus on the two best techniques: the best technique for creating objects with specialized functionalities (aka Encapsulation) and the best technique for reusing code (aka Inheritance). By “best” I mean the most apt, the most efficient, the most robust.

Continue Reading

How to Learn JavaScript Properly

»feb. 24 2013 655

Learn JavaScript Properly (For Beginners and Experienced Programmers)

This study guide, which I also refer to as a course outline and a road map, gives you a structured and instructive outline for learning JavaScript properly. In fact, you will find two study guides below, one for absolute beginners and the other for experienced programmers and web developers.

Bov Academy

of Programming and Innovation

Become an Elite/Highly Paid Specialized Software Engineer (Frontend, Fullstack, etc.)

Within 8–10 Months, Earn MORE than the Avg. New CS Graduate Earns.

45%-Off Tuition for the December Session

By the founder of JavaScriptIsSexy

You do want to learn JavaScript. I presume you are here for that reason, and you have made a wise decision. For if you want to develop modern websites and web applications (including an internet startup), or if you want a high-paying developer job ($75K to $250K+), JavaScript is undoubtedly the best web-development language to learn today, unless you want to develop native iOS or Android apps exclusively. And while there exist ample online resources to teach you JavaScript, finding the most efficient and beneficial method to learn the “language of the web” can be a frustrating endeavor. This study guide streamlines and simplifies the process; it has proven successful in helping thousands, and thousands more read and follow it each day.

Study Groups
People have started study groups for this study guide. You can find such groups on Reddit here and here, and other places, including Code Crew Meetup.

What You will Learn

You will learn the JavaScript language (up to advanced-intermediate, if you follow the “Beginners” study guide; or up to advanced, if you follow the “Experienced Programmers” study guide). You will also learn HTML, CSS, jQuery, and Git. And you will build a simple HTML/CSS website, an interactive HTML/CSS/JavaScript website, and a moderately sophisticated JavaScript quiz application.

  • Receive Updates

How Will Your Life Change After You Learn JavaScript Properly?

Maybe you will look more lovely and have a kinder, more pleasant personality after you learn JavaScript properly. Who knows? I don’t know.

But I do know that you will emerge more confident, more assured in your ability, and amply trained with a highly valued skill—a skill more valuable than most college degrees. For as a JavaScript developer, you will have the capacity not only to create whatever startup or web app you imagine, but also to work, making a handsome salary, as a front-end or full-stack developer, developing modern and futuristic applications. In fact, if you have never developed any kind of application before, you will experience ecstasy, so exultant and euphoric that you will want to enthusiastically practice more and build something—anything, like a hungry chef discovering a furnished kitchen with every tool, every utensil, and a stocked refrigerator.

It is worth noting that unlike just a couple of years ago—when you needed to know a true server-side language (such as PHP, Rails, Java, Python, or Perl) to develop scalable, dynamic, and database-driven web applications—today you can do as much and more with JavaScript alone.

This is the flourishing and glorious age of the JavaScript developer.
Continue Reading

Understand JavaScript Closures With Ease

»feb. 2 2013 238

Closures allow JavaScript programmers to write better code. Creative, expressive, and concise. We frequently use closures in JavaScript, and, no matter your JavaScript experience, you will undoubtedly encounter them time and again. Sure, closures might appear complex and beyond your scope, but after you read this article, closures will be much more easily understood and thus more appealing for your everyday JavaScript programming tasks.

Bov Academy

of Programming and Innovation

Become an Elite/Highly Paid Specialized Software Engineer (Frontend, Fullstack, etc.)

Within 8–10 Months, Earn MORE than the Avg. New CS Graduate Earns.

45%-Off Tuition for the December Session

By the founder of JavaScriptIsSexy

This is a relatively short (and sweet) post on the details of closures in JavaScript. You should be familiar with JavaScript variable scope before you read further, because to understand closures you must understand JavaScript’s variable scope.

  • Receive Updates

What is a closure?
A closure is an inner function that has access to the outer (enclosing) function’s variables—scope chain. The closure has three scope chains: it has access to its own scope (variables defined between its curly brackets), it has access to the outer function’s variables, and it has access to the global variables.

The inner function has access not only to the outer function’s variables, but also to the outer function’s parameters. Note that the inner function cannot call the outer function’s arguments object, however, even though it can call the outer function’s parameters directly.

You create a closure by adding a function inside another function.
A Basic Example of Closures in JavaScript:

function showName (firstName, lastName) {

var nameIntro = "Your name is ";
    // this inner function has access to the outer function's variables, including the parameter
function makeFullName () {
        
return nameIntro + firstName + " " + lastName;
    
}

return makeFullName ();

}


showName ("Michael", "Jackson"); // Your name is Michael Jackson


Closures are used extensively in Node.js; they are workhorses in Node.js’ asynchronous, non-blocking architecture. Closures are also frequently used in jQuery and just about every piece of JavaScript code you read.
A Classic jQuery Example of Closures:

$(function() {

var selections = []; 
$(".niners").click(function() { // this closure has access to the selections variable
selections.push (this.prop("name")); // update the selections variable in the outer function's scope
});

});

Closures’ Rules and Side Effects
Continue Reading

JavaScript Variable Scope and Hoisting Explained

»jan. 31 2013 102

In this post, we will learn JavaScript’s variable scope and hoisting and all the idiosyncrasies of both.

We must understand how variable scope and variable hoisting work in JavaScript, if want to understand JavaScript well. These concepts may seem straightforward; they are not. Some important subtleties exist that we must understand, if we want to thrive and excel as JavaScript developers.

  • Receive Updates

Variable Scope
A variable’s scope is the context in which the variable exists. The scope specifies from where you can access a variable and whether you have access to the variable in that context.

Bov Academy

of Programming and Innovation

Become an Elite/Highly Paid Specialized Software Engineer (Frontend, Fullstack, etc.)

Within 8–10 Months, Earn MORE than the Avg. New CS Graduate Earns.

45%-Off Tuition for the December Session

By the founder of JavaScriptIsSexy

Variables have either a local scope or a global scope.

Local Variables (Function-level scope)
Unlike most programming languages, JavaScript does not have block-level scope (variables scoped to surrounding curly brackets); instead, JavaScript has function-level scope. Variables declared within a function are local variables and are only accessible within that function or by functions inside that function. See my post on Closures for more on accessing variables in outer functions from inner functions.
Continue Reading

JavaScript Objects in Detail

»jan. 27 2013 169

JavaScript’s core—most often used and most fundamental—data type is the Object data type. JavaScript has one complex data type, the Object data type, and it has five simple data types: Number, String, Boolean, Undefined, and Null. Note that these simple (primitive) data types are immutable (cannot be changed), while objects are mutable (can be changed).

Bov Academy

of Programming and Innovation

Become an Elite/Highly Paid Specialized Software Engineer (Frontend, Fullstack, etc.)

Within 8–10 Months, Earn MORE than the Avg. New CS Graduate Earns.

45%-Off Tuition for the December Session

By the founder of JavaScriptIsSexy

What is an Object
An object is an unordered list of primitive data types (and sometimes reference data types) that is stored as a series of name-value pairs. Each item in the list is called a property (functions are called methods).

Consider this simple object:

var myFirstObject = {firstName: "Richard", favoriteAuthor: "Conrad"};

Think of an object as a list that contains items, and each item (a property or a method) in the list is stored by a name-value pair. The property names in the example above are firstName and favoriteAuthor. And the values are “Richard” and “Conrad.”

  • Receive Updates

Continue Reading

JavaScript Prototype in Plain Language

»jan. 25 2013 147

Prototype is a fundamental concept that every JavaScript developer must understand, and this article aims to explain JavaScript’s prototype in plain, detailed language. If you don’t understand JavaScript’s prototype after reading this blog post, please ask questions in the comments below. I will personally answer all questions.

To understand prototype in JavaScript you must understand objects in JavaScript. If you aren’t already familiar with objects, you should read my post JavaScript Objects in Detail. Also, know that a property is simply a variable defined on a function.

  • Receive Updates

There are two interrelated concepts with prototype in JavaScript:

  1. First, every JavaScript function has a prototype property (this property is empty by default), and you attach properties and methods on this prototype property when you want to implement inheritance. This prototype property is not enumerable; that is, it isn’t accessible in a for/in loop. But Firefox and most versions of Safari and Chrome have a __proto__ “pseudo” property (an alternative syntax) that allows you to access an object’s prototype property. You will likely never use this __proto__ pseudo property, but you should know that it exists and it is simply a way to access an object’s prototype property in some browsers.

    The prototype property is used primarily for inheritance; you add methods and properties on a function’s prototype property to make those methods and properties available to instances of that function.

    Consider this simple example of inheritance with the prototype property (more on inheritance later):
    Continue Reading

Pilgrimage to JavaScript Mastery

»jan. 20 2013 7

(From Absolute Beginner to Attainment)

Join me as we embark on a pilgrimage to JavaScript mastery—where the eminent few reside in a consciousness of JavaScript enlightenment and programming prominence. This mastery is a state of mindfulness that such experts as Douglas Crockford, John Resig, and Nicholas Zackas, amongst others, possess, and it is this state we are destined for, even as we have no assurance we will arrive there and it is unlikely we will ever get there.

Yes, we will endure inevitable bugs, tireless frustrations, ever-changing frameworks, and unknown circumstances that we must debug and resolve. But we are guaranteed insightful discoveries, euphoric accomplishments, and technical scholarship while on this pilgrimage. And even though we may never experience JavaScript enlightenment quite like Crockford and Zakas, we will be better programmers, accomplished developers, and perhaps successful entrepreneurs along the way.

On this pilgrimage, we will learn mostly from books (that we should each own) by Nicholas C. Zakas, David Flanagan, David Herman (new author), Douglas Crockford, and others, and from outstanding blog posts by prolific JavaScript bloggers like Addy Osmani.

Our journey has just begun; everyone is invited to join anytime. We have already learned JavaScript properly and Backbone.js completely, but we have much to learn. We will thoroughly understand sixteen JavaScript concepts that we must know well, and we will continue to learn scores of advanced JavaScript topics and modern JavaScript frameworks along the way.

Later, we will have a place to show our projects and encourage each other.

Keep an eye on the Upcoming Posts section in the sidebar for where our journey will take us next.